Dods at Party Conference 2018

Labour | Conservatives | SNP

16 January 2019

Please find below the Royal College of Emergency Medicine's Brefing: Making the Case for the Four Hour Standard.

Key messages • In England the Four-Hour Standard was met in all types of Emergency Departments from 2004-05 until 2013-14. Annual performance remained above 90% in Type 1 EDs from 2004-05 to 2014-15. • The Four-Hour Standard was introduced to the NHS in England in 2004 to combat crowding in EDs. Since its introduction there is no doubt that waiting times have been reduced.   • Evidence for the efficacy of time-based targets is limited in the UK but more extensive overseas. A single centre UK study showed that improvements in performance against the standard were associated with reductions in mortality.  • Several Australian studies have shown reduced mortality associated with introducing a timebased target.    • Since 2015 NHS Emergency Departments in England have failed to meet the standard.    • This is a result of increasingly elderly and complex case demographics, restrictions on social care services, inadequate staffing levels and insufficient...
16 January 2019

The Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM) notes the recent media speculation with regards to the proposed dismantling of the four-hour Emergency Care Standard (ECS) based upon the comments made by Mr Simon Stevens and others. 

Dr Taj Hassan, RCEM President, said: “The College has not been consulted at any stage on this issue since 2017. As the expert academic body on the standards of safety and clinical care delivered in Emergency Departments (EDs) this is surprising and of serious concern. “The four-hour ECS has been a resilient, sophisticated and very successful overall marker of a hospital's emergency care system performance for the last 15 years. Sadly, the past five or six years has seen a steady deterioration in system performance due to under investment in acute hospital bed capacity, cuts in social care funding and understaffing in EDs. This has resulted in a significant increase in the number of crowded EDs which scientific evidence clearly shows is linked to increased mortality and morbidity for patients. It also results in secondary attritional harm to staff having to work in such environments which further compromises patient care.” The College has consistently advocated that the best way to...
16 January 2019
Royal Mail staff delivering letters

A Tory MP is calling for a ban on low-level letterboxes to try and stop long-suffering posties from getting injured on the job.

Backbencher Vicky Ford has proposed a bill which would clamp down on property developers and compel them to make sure letterboxes in new buildings are "positioned above a certain height". It follows years of campaigning from posties' unions to try and stop workers suffering dog bites, back injuries and trapped fingers. She told MPs: "The purpose of the bill is to improve the health and safety of workers, particularly postmen and women, paperboys and girls and other deliverers. "I met the Communication Workers' Union. They told me the key issue for their members - and it's not Brexit. It is low-level letterboxes and dangerous dogs. "Now I am not asking homeowners to retrospectively change their existing letterboxes or replace their front doors. When it comes to front doors, Mr Speaker, a lot of people are very fond of their knockers. "This bill simply wants to stop developers from building swathes of homes each with a letterbox placed near the ground. And I hope that this will be...
16 January 2019
PMQs

Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn went head to head after the historic Brexit defeat last night and before the no-confidence debate in her government.

  liveblogpro.load({"id":"5c3f102b0e4a85dc768b462a","at":"01cfd6d9f6980697551eea00"});
16 January 2019
Jeremy Corbyn

A member of staff in Jeremy Corbyn's office has accused Labour MPs who back a second EU referendum of wanting a Tory government.

Joe Bradley, who has responsibility for trade union and NEC relations, attacked the MPs after they issued a statement piling pressure on the Labour boss to back a so-called "people's vote". Shadow Minister Roberta Blackman Woods was among those who put their name to a statement urging the Labour leader to back a fresh poll if the Government survives tonight's motion of no confidence. But Mr Bradley took to Twitter to say: "Not a single one of these MPs cares about removing the Tory government." Jeremy Corbyn staffer Joe Bradley has now deleted this tweet. Worth bearing in mind that leaving open the option of supporting a second referendum remains Labour policy. pic.twitter.com/oFmeTjpBl2 — Kevin Schofield () January 16, 2019 He has since deleted the post. But one MP...
16 January 2019

The system of monthly assessment termed the Minimum Income Floor is a disaster, and politicians from all sides must come together to address this before resuming the roll-out, says IPSE.

Instead of constantly tinkering with Universal Credit, the government needs to properly review how it can be made to work more effectively for everyone. Amber Rudd has wisely announced a delay in the roll-out of Universal Credit and now policymakers must use this time to tackle the fundamental flaws in the scheme. The self-employed in particular are suffering as Universal Credit does not account for the variable income that is part and parcel of working independently. The system of monthly assessment termed the Minimum Income Floor is a disaster, and politicians from all sides must come together to address this before resuming the roll-out.
16 January 2019
PMQs

Keep up with the all the latest Commons action LIVE as Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn face off at midday. Watch the whole thing below the blog window.

    liveblogpro.load({"id":"5c3f102b0e4a85dc768b462a","at":"01cfd6d9f6980697551eea00"});      
16 January 2019

IPSE (the Association of Independent Professionals and the Self-Employed) has welcomed the drop in inflation announced today, but warned further Brexit uncertainty after the Government’s defeat could harm the self-employed.

Office of National Statistics (ONS) data released today showed that inflation fell from 2.3 per cent in November to 2.1 per cent in December. This was driven by a drop in the price of petrol, which was, in turn, caused by tumbling oil prices and a smaller rise in air fares than last year. Ryan Barnett, IPSE’s Economic Policy Advisor commented: “The drop in inflation – in line with expectations and close to the Bank of England target – will be welcomed by the self-employed. This is the lowest level in two years. The drop in the price of petrol by over 6p is particularly significant, given how much more self-employed people travel – both to their clients’ sites and to find new work. “Overall, this means income in real terms is higher, and freelancers – who are vital to the health of the UK economy – will feel more money in their pocket. “There is, however, continued uncertainty about the progress of Brexit after the government suffered a major defeat in Parliament last night...
16 January 2019

Chair of the Bar Council’s Brexit Working Group, Hugh Mercer QC, explains the options for the UK following Parliament’s rejection of the Prime Minister’s Brexit deal yesterday.

The Parliamentary vote was often presented as a binary choice between the Prime Minister’s deal and no deal, but it was never going to be that straightforward. The Supreme Court judgment in Miller means that completing the process of leaving the EU will require primary legislation passed by a majority of the House of Commons. Now that the Prime Minister’s deal has been rejected, she must come back to Parliament within the next three days with a new plan of action. Parliament will have the opportunity to amend those proposals so, under section 13 of the European Withdrawal Act, MPs can indicate their preference for an alternative deal or, eventually, give instructions to the Government as to how it should proceed. This is why the door is now more open to a range of other options beyond the Prime Minister’s ‘deal or no deal’.  Those options include substituting the Political Declaration for a Canada plus style arrangement, a Norway plus deal with the UK becoming an EFTA...
16 January 2019

The supply chain needs to be a fairer place for SME subcontractors, says NFB.

Debbie Abrahams MP has pledged to introduce a ten minute rule bill in Parliament ensuring that public sector projects over £500,000 use project bank accounts. Abrahams thinks that her bill would stop small and medium-sized (SME) businesses being paid late by large companies, whilst protecting them from losing any money they are owed. Project bank accounts (PBAs) are ring-fenced bank accounts within a trust arrangement so that, if a tier 1 contractor collapses, as Carillion did in January 2018, subcontractors will still receive money they are owed. The National Federation of Builders (NFB) admires Abrahams’s hard work towards ensuring that SME subcontractors are treated with respect throughout the supply chain and the public sector needs to take a leading role in stamping out late payment. Richard Beresford, chief executive of the NFB, said: “The NFB applauds Abrahams’s efforts to make the supply chain a fairer place for SME subcontractors. This bill could be the nudge needed to...